Error message when you run an ASP.NET 2.0 application on a Windows Server 2003: “Server unavailable”

When you try to run a Microsoft ASP.NET 2.0 application on a Microsoft Windows Server 2003-based computer, you may receive the following error message:

Server Unavailable

Additionally, an error message that resembles following is logged in the Application log:
Event Type: Error
Event Source: ASP.NET 2.0
Event Category: None
Event ID: 1088
Date: Date
Time: Time
User: N/A
Computer: ComputerName
Description: Failed to execute request because the App-Domain could not be created. Error: 0x80070005 Access is denied.

CAUSE

This issue may occur if you try to run the ASP.NET 2.0 application after you perform an in-place upgrade of the existing Windows Server 2003 installation by using a Windows Server 2003 CD that is integrated with Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 (SP2).

When you perform an in-place upgrade, the upgrade process resets the permissions on the Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) metabase and on other folders that are used by ASP.NET. Therefore, the custom service account will not have permissions to access these folders, and you receive the error message that is mentioned in the “Symptoms” section.

Note An in-place upgrade is also known as a “repair installation.”

RESOLUTION

To resolve this issue, configure the custom service account by using the Aspnet_regiis.exe utility. At a command prompt, run the Aspnet_regiis.exe utility from ASP.NET 2.0 by using the -ga switch:

Aspnet_regiis -ga AccountName

Note In this command, AccountName represents the custom service account.

For example, you can run the following command to grant permissions to the NT AUTHORITY\NETWORK SERVICE account:

aspnet_regiis -ga “NT AUTHORITY\NETWORK SERVICE”

.


APPLIES TO
    Microsoft ASP.NET 2.0, when used with:
    Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition (32-bit x86)
    Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition (32-bit x86)

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    Microsoft Knowledge Base Article

    This article contents is Microsoft Copyrighted material.
    Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Terms of Use | Trademarks


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